Tech Talk: NBAA

Recently, I began preparing a session for the NBAA conference in Orlando targeted at the aviation industry. I struggled identifying the needs of the audience since they were a bit different than I usually have the opportunity to speak to. The following article was not the presentation I gave, but an early direction to introduce several technology concepts to the group and help them understand how these topics could improve their business processes and general operations. The primary topics included:

  • Electronic Data
  • Specialized Software (and SaaS)
  • The Cloud
  • Mobile
  • Security Tips

Though I ultimately presented a slightly different direction for this material, I think it still has some value to be presented here.

Migrating from paper to electronic systems is a challenge. Technically, the data needs to be structured in a way that computer systems understand, but the real challenge comes from user adoption. Paper let’s you write anything you want, change workflow however you need at that moment, and is comfortable to some workforces that are still not yet at ease with computers.

However, the move to electronic data allows for real time validation of the data to significantly reduce mistakes, gives us visibility into trends that may be occurring, and allows us to access the information by several people at a time.

Take reporting aviation discrepancies for example; at Flightdocs, we have seen a number of operators switch from a paper based write-up to electronic. Images and video can be captured and attached to the discrepancy for later evaluation and over time, we can begin to track trends in part failure or unexpected use.

As you begin to move your data to electronic systems you may be tempted to move to Excel or other similar general use software. This is a great start, but it has many drawbacks. Data is typically not validated and doesn’t reflect the real use of the data such as proper tolerances or required fields.

Collaboration becomes a real issue as emailing files back and forth is fraught with errors and typically if the file exists on a network it can only be in use by one person at a time.

Look for specific software that solves an important problem for you. Whether it is maintenance, flight scheduling, inventory, or accounting — find an expert company that can help you tackle these problems in a purpose driven way.

In most cases, I advise against buying on-premise software if possible. This is software that you have to install and maintain at your company and comes with all kinds of hidden costs and complexity. At Flightdocs, we both use software as a service as customers, and providers as our business. This is software that is hosted by someone else, often in a cloud, and is accessed by the internet for a monthly or yearly fee.

The cloud, at it’s simplest form is a way of renting servers from another company with quite a bit of magic thrown in to handle massive scaling. However, this over simplification shouldn’t belittle how important this shift in technology is and all of the tremendous opportunities it now gives us.

In the past, it was incredibly difficult to scale quickly and across continents. It meant purchasing servers, setting up data centers, staffing the appropriate IT resources to manage the hardware and software, and keeping everything up to date and running smoothly.

The cloud allows all of that scale and complexity to disappear and you to simply use or develop applications and has led to more innovation in mobile device software and internet enabled embedded devices.

Now that you’ve moved from paper to electronic, selected the right targeted software for your operations, and have access to that data anywhere through the internet, look to mobile for access away from your desktop.

Imagine each leg of your flight updating compliance metrics and aircraft times in real time to help keep your due list in check or notify home base of necessary maintenance or inventory orders.

You could even dispatch work to individuals who can follow up with their mobile devices and keep getting the latest information throughout the day.

Now that we’ve built up this discussion with all of the good things you can do with technology, let’s share a couple of important drawbacks.

When you go to software as a service or to the cloud, you intentionally give up a lot of responsibility. This can also work against you in that you may not have as much control if there is an issue. In computers, we all know that things aren’t perfect. Outages do happen, hardware does fail, and mistakes are made. If you are already outfitted with the best experts in supporting a production quality network and application, then it may not make sense for you to give over this control.

Security is a double edged topic. If the data that you are storing is of significantly high security, such as weapons systems, or medical patient information, then you may want to reconsider a cloud provider. This is not to say that a cloud provider is going to be necessarily less secure, but you have less direct oversight and therefore are unable to answer some specific security requirements for certain certifications.

  • Home Depot — 56m credit cards potentially stolen through installed malware on cash register machines.
  • JP Morgan — Month long attack stealing 76m names, email addresses, addresses, and phone numbers of account holders.
  • Ebay — 145m user accounts potentially compromised by hackers stealing employee accounts.
  • Adobe — 152m credentials accessed and sensitive information erased.
  • Target — 70m records stolen from compromised magnetic strips on card readers.

When you opt to start moving more and more data to the cloud, you’re making your information more accessible. This is a good thing, but it needs to be controlled for the right people. There are several steps that you can take to further protect yourself and your data.

Here are a few helpful tips:

  • Always use a strong password. These are passwords that can be harder to remember but provide much better security.
  • Never use the same password on more than one system. By enforcing this, you limit your exposure if by some chance a password is compromised.
  • Always ensure you are connecting over secure traffic, look for sites that show a lock in the address bar.
  • Ask for and setup multi-factor authentication to help protect you, even if your password is stolen. Multi-factor authentication also called 2-factor authentication is when you have a username and password and a second factor such as your phone to confirm login attempts.
  • When using a software as a service company, ensure your password is hashed when stored. Flightdocs uses one way hashing to prevent decryption attacks.
  • Ask about encrypted data practices when moving data to the cloud. Not all data needs to be encrypted, but data that you consider sensitive should be.
  • Keep computers and browsers up to date with the latest patches.
  • Install virus and malware scanning software on your computer to help prevent attacks.
  • Always set a pin or login for your mobile phone. Phones are easy to steal and provide lots of information as we adopt mobile access strategies.
  • Be careful with roaming settings on your phone due to wireless hijacking.
  • Backup your data, but also be careful to encrypt and protect backups as they can become vulnerable sources of data.

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